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LOSING THE GRIP ON A HEALTHY WORK-LIFE BALANCE

LOSING THE GRIP ON A HEALTHY WORK-LIFE BALANCE

New Survey from BlueSteps.com Shows 55% of Senior Executives Unsatisfied with their Work-Life Balance
In April this year BlueSteps.com, the executive career management service of the Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC), surveyed over 800 senior executives worldwide to discover the latest attitudes to work-life balance. (The Economist Intelligence Unit assisted with the development of survey questions.) Of those surveyed, over half reported that they currently do not have a satisfactory work-life balance the highest dissatisfaction figure recorded since the survey began in 2006. Employers missing a work-life balance trick eighty per cent of BlueSteps executives say that work-life balance is critical in their decision whether to join or remain with an employer, yet 82 per cent report that their company does not have a program in place to improve work-life balance. The results show a clear disconnect between the way in which organisations view work-life balance as compared to the value placed upon it by executives.

Of the 18 per cent of companies offering work-life balance programs, the most common components offered are home working and a flexible daily work schedule also the components voted as highly valuable by respondents.
AESC President, Peter Felix, commented, The success of any organisation is dependent on those running the show, so healthy and satisfied executives are vital to overall performance. The latest BlueSteps.com results indicate that many organisations are overlooking the fundamental link between a healthy company and healthy executives.
In with the blackberry, out with leisure time

The large majority of respondents (70 per cent) feel that a modern lifestyle, defined by new technology and globalisation, has decreased their leisure time. An astonishing 32 per cent rate their career as more, or as, important as their health - raising the question of what constitutes a healthy and productive company culture. If bad health equals bad performance then organisations have a vested interest in promoting a healthy work-life balance.
Almost all executives rate their career as more important, or as important, as personal leisure or hobbies, while only 35 per cent take full advantage of their allotted paid time off (holiday time) each year.
Promotion not always the road to happiness despite many executives giving up a good work-life balance to meet the requirements of modern professional life, 21 per cent would refuse a promotion if it negatively affected their work-life balance and 50 per cent might refuse a promotion.

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