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2010 GRADUATE RECRUITERS SURVEY

2010 GRADUATE RECRUITERS SURVEY
 
The second annual survey of graduate recruitment professionals remuneration and aspirations.
 
BACKGROUND TO 2010 SURVEY
 
Napier Wolf In-house
 
The Napier Wolf Group is the leading provider of recruiting talent to in-house, executive search, and agency recruitment functions. Napier Wolf In-house was formed under the brand Aspen Partners in 2006 before adopting the groups brand name this year. As the leading independent provider of in-house recruitment talent in the UK and further afield, were delighted to bring the second survey of graduate recruitment professionals to you in 2010. As far as possible, weve replicated the format on the 2009 survey to give a strong comparative feel to the results.
 
Additionally, in consultation with the AGR who we extend our thanks to for their support again this year, we have included Graduate Development Professionals in the survey for the first time. A range of new survey questions were also added, focussing on the development and training of those working within the profession.
 
We hope that the survey makes valuable reading for graduate recruiting and development professionals and as ever, we welcome feedback to improve on the survey for next year. Last years excellent feedback was critical to changes made this year including adding the capacity to regionalise results and a switch to real spot salary data, as opposed to bandings, to give a more accurate reflection of average earnings.
 
Graduate Recruitment Overview
 
What a year we have had since the last survey results were published. If 2009 was summed up by bravery in the face of aversion - graduate recruitment professionals taking on the operating conditions around them to continue to deliver a hugely valued service - 2010 could not be more different. While operating conditions for many have eased, expectations have grown with them, particularly to deliver a better, quicker service for less money with less resource. Frustration abound!
 
The 2010 AGR Conference was a useful temperature check for the industry at mid-year point and there were some extremely consistent themes: high levels of applicants per role, but those applicants in the main failing to deliver a company or role-specific application, leaving recruiters high on volumes of candidates to reject, but short on the talent they needed to fill roles higher expectation from line management to see the best talent, because the headlines gave the impression that there was still lots of it on the bench the spectre of outsourcing hanging over the graduate recruitment function, albeit it against statistics within our survey that show this potential trend has not progressed any further than a year ago and a clear feeling that to make graduate recruitment better, more resource (financial and people) would be needed.
 
Goals of the survey
 
2010s survey goals differ from 2009, as this time we can set this years figures in context against last years results, as well as viewing them as a single moment in time. This plays an important part in this years analysis. It is particularly important for us in terms of the way that graduate recruitment is being delivered and the aspirations of the professionals who work within it, as there is currently a huge amount of buzz around the changes in the sector. Finally, this year we and the AGR were extremely keen to understand how the career development of the graduate recruitment professional is being supported, so we added a whole range of questions relating to training and support, which has given a lot of food for thought.
 
 
 
Average basic salary based on role

This survey shows the average base salary according to job title. As with all further base salary comparative data, 2010 figures are based on exact results given by respondents, as opposed to 2009 responses, which were given in specified ranges. Job title

Salary 2010

Salary 2009

Recruitment Officer

27,000

30,000-39,999

Development Officer

29,500

-

Recruitment Manager (no reps)

40,200

30,000-39,999

Development Manager (no reps)

38,300

-

Recruitment Manager (with reps)

43,300

40,000-49,999

Development Manager (with reps)

38,800

-

Head of Recruitment

71,200

60,000-74,999

Head of Development

82,200

-
 
 
 
 

Highest basic salary based on role Job title

Salary 2010

Salary 2009

Recruitment Officer

50,000

40,000-49,999

Development Officer

36,500

-

Recruitment Manager (no reps)*

100,000 / 66,000

50,000-59,999

Development Manager (no reps)

47,000

-

Recruitment Manager (with reps)

77,300

75,000

Development Manager (with reps)

51,000

-

Head of Recruitment

110,000

75,000

Head of Development

110,000

-
 
 
 
 
KEY INFLUENCES ON EARNINGS AND ASPIRATIONS
 
In 2009, some of the starkest differences in results were driven by the sector in which graduate recruitment professionals worked. This was particularly evident at Head of and Manager level, where respondents working in financial services were able to claim the highest base salaries and access to the highest bonus schemes. In 2010, we have seen less of an impact from sector and a greater relevance of progression through the ranks and time served in a role.
 
Indeed, this year, we can draw the following conclusions:
Only those at Head of level had received a bonus of 20% and above
Those receiving the highest bonus levels had been in post and in sector for the longest period of time
Graduate recruitment and development officers were more likely than not to receive no bonus at all this year and these employees are the ones that have driven up the overall response rate of those receiving no bonus to 38%
 
 
ASPIRATIONS
 
Our key measure in 2009 and 2010 was to ask professionals where their careers were heading. The turbulent market of 2009 threw up a great deal of uncertainty, with many professionals believing a change of direction was likely within their careers. Encouragingly in 2010, fewer professionals wish to move out. Many would like to add facets to their existing careers, but there is a sense that the majority are already on their chosen career path and wish to continue in the same direction.
 
 
FACTORS IN DELIVERING YOUR ROLE
 
No change there
 
In 2009, we measured a number of metrics on how the role of graduate recruitment is delivered: outsourcing, campus management, involvement of professionals in marketing, and proportions of businesses that have a campus champion. As with 2009, we had a wealth of data this year and with so much talk of cutbacks and savings to be made by businesses, we expected to see major changes, such as a rise in outsourcing and drastic reductions in team headcounts.
The reality is that there has been very little change and so for this report, we have decided to leave the majority of the data in the appendix, should the detail be of interest to you. As it stands, there are no signs of changes to the delivery of graduate recruitment in the 2010 survey.
 
 

TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT Training opportunity

Percentage

In-house training

81%

Mentoring

30%

External training

65%
 
 
 
 
 

Qualification

Percentage

Undergraduate degree

73%

Masters

17.5%

AGR Standard

4%

CIPD studying

23%

CIPD completed

23%

 
 
 
 

Are you an AGR member?

Percentage

Yes

86%

No

14%
 
 
This is the first year that we have examined metrics on training and development for graduate recruitment professionals, and the signs are encouraging. The vast majority are engaged by the business and offered training and development. The biggest surprise we found in the results, from our perspective, related to qualifications. It has long been felt within the in-house recruiting community that while the CIPD fails to offer a wholly relevant qualification for recruiters, there are few alternatives. The AGR Standard for Graduate Recruitment Professionals offers just that, yet the take-up at the moment is low. In our conclusions, we will put our case for the qualification, but hope in subsequent years to see a rise in the formal qualifications held by recruiters which relate specifically to their roles. Further details of the AGR Standard can be found at www.agr.org.uk/content/overview-of-the-AGR-standard.
 
 
 
CONCLUSIONS
 
If I could change one thing
 
It is rare to start at the end, but this year it seems appropriate. In 2009 and 2010, we asked if there was one thing that the graduate recruitment professional could change about their role, what it would be. The contrast in responses could not be stronger. I am sure that most recruitment and development professionals would prefer to forget 2009 as a working year, but there was a far more positive response to the question then, as the profession faced up to the recession. In 2009, typically respondents said they would not change much about their role at all. This year, the contrast is stark with only one respondent answering that way. The majority were seeking more tools and resource to perform their job well, and ideally more reward (financial and recognition) for doing it.
 
As we emerge from a recession in which there have been few personal opportunities for development or to move roles, it is only natural that, like any other, the graduate recruitment and development professional looks to their own career, having accepted the status quo in the tough times. This years survey gives a clear picture of why many graduate recruitment and development professionals are doing just that. Salaries for the majority are at best static and bonuses are non-existent or low for all but the most senior of staff.
 
This year, for the first time, we looked at the support for development and training that respondents received, and the findings are critical. It is hugely encouraging to see that the vast majority receive access to training - 81% internally and 65% externally - but does this go far enough? If, as we have alluded to, only the most senior members of the profession receive the highest financial rewards and claim the highest levels of job satisfaction, then the profession must support real development of more junior staff to gain the qualifications needed to perform those roles in the future. While there is an ongoing debate in the HR profession as to the most relevant qualifications available today, the access and levels of qualification of graduate recruitment and development professionals is disappointingly low.
 
The AGR Standard, which should and could represent the most relevant qualification in this profession, currently has a poor take-up rate. Just 4% of respondents had successfully completed it, no further respondents were studying towards it and 49% had never even heard of it. If graduate recruitment and development is going to move forward, this qualification must become relevant to career development. Here, the emphasis is not on the AGR, who as providers are admirably performing their task, but on the profession and HR functions to embrace it, and potentially for CIPD to recognize the qualification as part of its own. Indeed, the AGR Standard could solve a major problem for CIPD with little effort, as the CIPD qualification is often sought by recruitment professionals, but is rarely seen as relevant to the function nor provides a commercial overview. The AGR Standard would do just that for Graduate Recruitment.
 
 
Remuneration
 
This year, we have successfully gathered accurate spot data on salaries for the first time. This will allow us to set a stronger benchmark for year-on-year analysis of salaries across job titles and sectors. While last year there were clear disparities in salary created by sector and career progression, this year within job title there appear to be fewer influences.
 
It is encouraging to see that with spot salary analysis, it is clear that progression of rank is definitively rewarded financially with all levels surveyed seeing some form of step up in average base salaries. We are preparing a separate paper, to be released at the end of the year, looking at regional influences on salary, which seem to have the strongest impact at the lowest end of the salary scale for all levels.
 
Our decision to broaden this years survey with questions on training and development, regionalism within the UK, and the inclusion of graduate development professionals for the first time, has given us a far greater range of opportunities to analyse the profession. While this document gives a great overview, which we are naturally delighted to bring to the market, we are aware that there are further opportunities available to bring bespoke reports to the profession that would be of real value. To support this, we will publish further briefing papers before the end of the year relating specifically to:
 
the impact of location within the UK
 
the impact of sector
 
the impact of training, development and qualifications
 
in-depth analysis relating to job title
 
As ever at Napier Wolf, we want to provide you with meaningful analysis and data. If you have particular areas of interest that you would like further detail on or ideas of questions we should include in the survey in 2011, please let us know. Your feedback is critical to our ability to bring the market results that are of interest.

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