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Latest ONS figures released

UK unemployment total rose by 129,000 in the three months to September to 2.62 million

Commenting on the ONS labour Market Employment figures, Phil Sheridan, UK Managing Director, Robert Half International said:

“These figures are not a necessarily a true reflection of what is happening in certain sectors or professions in the UK. Business services, natural resources and some areas of financial services are industries where demand still outweighs supply for top talent, particularly in finance, accounting and IT. In some cases, companies are bringing on additional interim or temporary professionals to help manage strategic initiatives and demanding workloads. We recently carried out a study which shows that nearly two-thirds of CFOs plan to use interims in the coming year, with many citing lack of both time and permanent staff having a negative impact on their business. There is movement in the job market and opportunities are available for those who display a strong commercial acumen, effective communication skills and solid technical aptitude.”

 

Lost generation a concern as youth unemployment hits 1 million

The UKeconomy was dealt another blow today as the latest unemployment figures showed record levels of unemployment, particularly among young people. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics showed unemployment among young people at its highest level, surpassing a million for the first time.

Carmen Watson, Managing Director of Pertemps Recruitment Partnership, said, “We are in danger of seeing an entire generation of young people that is falling through the holes in the system designed to create employment. It may be too early to expect to see the results of the Government’s Work Programme, which was introduced earlier this year, but in the meantime, thousands more young people are becoming disaffected by the harsh and challenging conditions we’re seeing in the job market.

“Be that as it may, there are steps young people can take to make themselves more employable and avoid joining the ever expanding ranks of long term unemployed people. As well as looking at the opportunities available for temporary work, young people should also look at how their transferrable skills lend themselves to the sectors that are growing at a faster rate than some of the others. Savvy job seekers who do their research into these industries and create a polished persona to present to potential employers will give themselves a huge advantage.”

 

CBI CALLS FOR ACTION ON YOUTH JOBS AFTER RISE IN UNEMPLOYMENT

The CBI today (Wednesday) commented on official data showing unemployment rose by 129,000 to 2.62 million in the three months to September, including a rise in youth unemployment to over a million.

John Cridland, CBI Director-General, said:

“These figures underline why we need urgent action to help our young people take their first steps in the labour market. A generation risks being scarred by the devastating effects of long-term unemployment.

“We are calling for action for jobs now, with a clear plan to get the UK working, focusing on our young people.

“The Chancellor should use his autumn statement to announce a Young Britain Credit, worth &pound1500, to encourage firms to take on an unemployed 16 to 24 year-old.

“We also need further steps to reform the benefits system to make work really pay and to foster better links between businesses and schools to boost the attractiveness of young people in the labour market.”

 

Labour market slump worsens – no evidence Eurozone to blame

Nigel Meager, Director of the Institute for Employment Studies, commented:

“These poor labour market figures were to be expected, with the economy stagnant and GDP still four per cent below its pre-recession level.

“The growth in youth unemployment continues to be a source of grave concern. There is a debate about changes in the way in which the figures are collated, and the inclusion of some groups of students. What is clear, however, is that the number of youngsters struggling to find a foothold in the jobs market is at its highest at least since the 1980s. This is storing up trouble for the future and raises questions about the wisdom of the government’s axing, earlier this year, of the Future Jobs Fund, targeted at precisely this group of young people.

“While it may be tempting to blame the latest poor labour market figures on the Eurozone crisis, there is no evidence whatsoever for such a conclusion. The labour market has been in the doldrums since well before the problems in the Eurozone kicked off. Unemployment, having grown dramatically in the first year of the recession to Spring 2009, has remained stuck in the 2.5-2.6 million range for the last two and a half years. Similarly job vacancies, having fallen rapidly in the first year of the recession, have remained flat at around 450,000 for the last two and a half years.

“What is true, however, is that the Eurozone problems are likely to reduce the chances of an early labour market recovery. The risk is that their impact on business confidence will further reduce demand from private sector employers, at the same time as the public sector jobs cuts really begin to bite.
Looking ahead, the picture remains unclear. There has been a spate of recent reports showing limited hiring plans in the private sector, and the underlying level of demand in the labour market remains very subdued, with nearly six unemployed to every vacancy. Having said that, the picture of labour demand emerging from these latest figures remains flat, rather than showing any great deterioration, with vacancies slightly up, redundancies slightly down, and a small increase in the total number of hours being worked.”

Analysis:

Today’s figures from the Office of National Statistics confirm that the labour market remains very subdued, although some indicators are less negative than commentators expected:

  The headline unemployment figure from the Labour Force Survey increased significantly by 129,000 over the quarter to September taking the total to 2.62 million, its highest level for seventeen years. The unemployment rate stands at 8.3 per cent.

  Within the overall figures for unemployment, youth unemployment was also strongly up, and has now breached the symbolic 1 million mark.

  Similarly, the monthly claimant count figure (the numbers claiming Jobseekers’ Allowance) rose by 5,300 in October. Although this was a smaller increase than most commentators anticipated, it is the eighth successive month of increase, taking the total to 1.6 million.

  The numbers in employment fell again by nearly 200,000 in the quarter to September.

  Job vacancies remained largely flat, recording a small rise of 7,000 to 462,000 in the three months to October.

  Overall redundancies fell slightly (by 7,000) over the quarter to September, although public sector redundancies increased.

 

THERE ARE STILL OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH THE RIGHT ATTITUDE

YOUNG PEOPLE WITH A & lsquo;REFUSE TO LOSE’ ATTITUDE WILL FIND WORK

Commenting on the UK unemployment statistics showing more than one million young people out of work, Managing Director of Manpower UK, Mark Cahill said:

“It’s all too easy to just gloomily sink our heads into our hands but there are still opportunities for young people with the right attitude.

“We are helping young people into work every day and have thousands of open vacancies for others showing a real desire and determination to work.

“Employers continue to look for skilled and motivated candidates, so those willing to take work experience and learn new skills are those who will succeed in this challenging environment.

“Those with a & lsquo;refuse to lose’ attitude will find work.

Latest jobless figures: REC calls for urgent action to help UK’s one million unemployed young people

Latest unemployment figures out today from the Office for National Statistics has shown the number of jobless has risen to 2.62 million in the three month period to September this year.

Of most concern is the increase in the numbers of young people out of work which has passed the million mark and now stands at 1.016 million

Commenting on the figures, Kevin Green, the Recruitment and Employment Confederation's Chief Executive said:

"Reaching one million is a black mark on the UK jobs market. If we are to tackle youth employment we need to see two things urgently happen. First, we need to stimulate demand through practical measures such as a National Insurance holiday for SMEs taking on young jobseekers. Second, we must galvanise the involvement of businesses and employment experts to raise awareness and aspirations and build better bridges into work.

"Jobs and growth must be the DNA of all Government policy, starting with the Chancellor's Autumn Statement. We need real action over the coming months to address this growing crisis and it falls to the Government to do more to help: simply acknowledging that there is a problem is not enough."

 

BCC: Government must help private sector create more jobs

In the three months to September 2011, unemployment rose by 129,000 people and the number of those unemployed between the ages of 16-24 rose to over a million

Commenting on the labour market figures published today by the ONS, David Kern, Chief Economist at the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC), said:

“These figures were disappointing but given both the worsening situation in the eurozone, and the impact of the government’s tough austerity plan, they are not surprising. The rise in youth unemployment to over a million is particularly concerning, but it should be stressed that more than a quarter of these are people in full-time education who are looking for part-time work.

“The immediate outlook is challenging as the private sector will find it difficult to immediately absorb those people who have lost their jobs in the public sector. We expect to see increases in the number of unemployed next year above 2.7m.

“Given these circumstances, the government must pursue policies that will strengthen the private sector’s ability to create jobs. Cutting red tape, and making it easier for people to acquire the necessary skills they need for employment are vital, but on their own will not suffice.

“The Autumn Statement will provide the Chancellor with an opportunity to introduce a comprehensive credit easing programme that will facilitate the flow of credit to businesses, most notably viable SMEs that find it difficult to access the necessary finance.”

 

Coalition has created 'a lost generation of young people' on the dole

The coalition was accused of condemning 'a lost generation of young people'

to the dole queue by Unite, the largest union in the country, today (Wednesday, 16 November).

As today's unemployment figures soared to a 17-year high, Unite called on ministers to create 'a land bridge of opportunity' for young people between leaving university and college, and entering the world of work.

The unemployment rate for young people, aged 16-24, broke through the one million barrier in September. The total jobless figure was 2,620,000.

Unite General Secretary, Len McCluskey said: 'The government has created a lost generation of young people unable to gain a foothold on the employment ladder.'

'Ministers need to create a land bridge of opportunity for young people - our youth unemployment rate is twice that of Germany.'

'It is not only a personal tragedy for the young people concerned, but it is also a waste of talent and potential, so necessary for economic growth, and is sowing the seeds for a whole raft of future social problems.'

'The government needs to adopt a twin-track policy - having more targeted measures to help young people into work, while at the same time, reversing the hardline austerity measures that have sucked the life out of the British economy.'

'One way forward would be to ensure that a greater percentage of apprenticeships should go to those aged under the age of 25.'

Unite has been at the forefront of the campaign to save the country's youth services from swingeing cuts, which the union sees as a vital link in

assisting young people into employment.  

Len McCluskey said: 'The rise in unemployment across the age range is an appalling indictment of the lack of economic imagination shown by this blinkered right-wing government.'

'But it is not just young people facing unemployment pain. Women, who are doing skilled manual and admin/clerical jobs - many of them in the financially squeezed public sector - have either lost their jobs or face redundancy. Women also have the added burden of juggling the family finances, as inflation continues unabated.'

'Manufacturing is struggling consumer spending has been strangled and economic confidence - whether it is investment decisions by business or job

security for individuals - is at very low ebb,'  

Unite has repeatedly called for the introduction of a Plan B aimed at boosting manufacturing putting 'demand' back into the economy i.e. cutting the 20 per cent VAT rate and maintaining the current level of public services.

 

UK unemployment total rose by 129,000 in the three months to September to 2.62 million

Commenting on the ONS labour Market Employment figures, Phil Sheridan, UK Managing Director, Robert Half International said:

“These figures are not a necessarily a true reflection of what is happening in certain sectors or professions in the UK. Business services, natural resources and some areas of financial services are industries where demand still outweighs supply for top talent, particularly in finance, accounting and IT. In some cases, companies are bringing on additional interim or temporary professionals to help manage strategic initiatives and demanding workloads. We recently carried out a study which shows that nearly two-thirds of CFOs plan to use interims in the coming year, with many citing lack of both time and permanent staff having a negative impact on their business. There is movement in the job market and opportunities are available for those who display a strong commercial acumen, effective communication skills and solid technical aptitude.”

 

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