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4,000+ Christmas jobs still unfilled as demand for seasonal staff soars

4,000 Christmas jobs still unfilled as demand for seasonal staff soars

With Christmas arriving in a matter of weeks, Job Search-Engine Adzuna.co.ukreveals that over 4,200 seasonal jobs are yet to be filled as employers struggle to recruit temporary staff to cope with the festive rush. The website has seen a huge spike in demand for temporary workers in sales, hospitality, retail and customer service, with clear indications that employers are willing to pay 4% more than average for seasonal staff.

The Royal Mail & Sainsbury’s top the list of Christmas employers once again this year, recruiting over 30,000 Christmas workers this winter between them (10% up on last year).  High Street chains like Nando’s and PizzaExpress appear to be struggling to recruit enough staff this December with hundreds of vacancies still are advertised between them.

Jobseekers should look to the Hospitality industry for remaining Christmas work. There are over 640 chef, waiter & bar staff vacancies still open around Britain. Retail and Sales job sectors are also rich with vacancies this season, particularly in the North East, and are offering applicants a healthy pay packet of up to &pound126 per day.  

The best-paid seasonal jobs this year are GP Locums and Event Managers receiving an eye-watering &pound1,500 per day. At the other end of the spectrum, the worst paid jobs are Santa's helpers and Gift Wrapper jobs. Those looking for weird and wonderful jobs this Christmas should consider roles as Christmas Tree Designers or even Mince Pie Chefs.

Andrew Hunter, Co-Founder of Adzuna, commented, “Christmas, this year, will see the temporary and part-time employment market booming as businesses recruit extra staff to cope with the festive rush.  Seasonal roles give candidates hard-to-find work experience which can lead to permanent job opportunities in the New Year - this is particularly important given the state of youth unemployment in Britain today.”

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