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Nicoll Curtin holds charity auction for World Child Cancer

Nicoll Curtin recently held a charity auction in aid of World Child Cancer. Through the auction, the company raised £2,000 for the charity, enough to pay for a doctor’s annual salary in Myanmar.

 

Nicoll Curtin, who are currently in the process of upgrading to a new office, auctioned away their furniture, electronics and more in aid of their partner charity. World Child Cancer works to improve diagnosis, treatment and care for children with cancer across the developing world. Natalie Varney, WCC’s corporate partnership manager, spoke at the event about the organisation’s important work in Myanmar.

 

In Myanmar, families of cancer-suffering children must relocate to Yangon or Mandalay for care. Unable to afford air travel, they instead brave a three-day trek across unpaved roads. According to Nicoll Curtin, many become separated from their loved ones. Others live in hospital-neighbouring shacks. Medical staff are insufficiently trained. Hygiene is poorly controlled, food isn’t provided and morphine is seldom used. Children dying of brain tumours, suffering tremendous pain, are given paracetamol. In a global context, these heartrending conditions align with a worldwide trend. There is a disturbing disparity in global cancer survival rates, with those diagnosed in the UK eight times more likely to be successfully treated.

 

WCC provide aid in travel costs and medicines, train medical staff and improve access to pain-relieving palliative care. Last year, they trained one thousand healthcare professionals and supported nearly three-and-a-half thousand children.

 

Forty years ago, survival rates hovered at close to zero. This advancement has been made not through drug discovery, but rather in drug distribution, an endeavour WCC has been instrumental in. Though treatment is government-funded, and pharmaceutical companies make drugs cheaper in the developing world, parents struggle to afford medications. Forty percent of patients abandon their treatment due to unaffordability, when just fifty pounds would pay for a course of chemotherapy. The cost of a pint of beer could pay for a child’s palliative care, significantly minimising their pain. Most families live on a dollar a day, and rely on charitable organisations like WCC to survive.

 

Neil Clark, Nicoll Curtin’s performance director, said, “Two of the most important tenets of Nicoll Curtin’s ethos are to put people first and to always do the right thing.”

 

“That’s why we believe it is absolutely vital that companies support charitable causes, community service and volunteerism. We feel blessed to have been able to support WCC in the past, and look forward to working with them again in future.

 

“Nicoll Curtin is passionate about helping causes like World Child Cancer, Inspire, the Movember Foundation or our own #CodingAllowed initiative, because we recognise that we are tremendously fortunate, and that we have a moral responsibility to use our resources to help others.”

 

Nicoll Curtin, as part of its Giving Back scheme, offers its staff paid leave to use towards volunteering at charities of their choice. It also runs #CodingAllowed, an initiative aimed at supporting aspiring female technologists pursue STEM careers.

 

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